Three Reasons to Learn Something New

In my own business, I have to be open to learning something new pretty often. It’s because opportunities come up that require a different skill than I have but that I can acquire without much effort if I want to. That brings me to this blog post on three reasons to learn something new. The first is below. The next will appear in my next two posts so stay tuned.

1. It opens up new opportunities

Like I said, sometimes I get offered a new assignment that is not something I’ve done before. So I open up my Lynda.com account and search for the courses they have on it if available. Then I start learning!

Learning by doing

I just got a job revising an ad created by another designer in a program named Sketch. It’s a program I’d learned about once and knew would be a good one to add to my skill set. I would need to get the program to do the job and luckily my client agreed to pay for half of the cost. Then I dove into the online course on it and learned enough to do the project.

Sketch welcome

Sketch, a Mac-only program

Learning has career benefits

Up until 2012, I had only a beginner’s knowledge of Adobe InDesign. In a past job, I worked in QuarkXpress. That was great because it helped me land a job at a corporation’s in-house advertising department that used that program. In my business though, I knew I needed to get up to speed on InDesign, which seemed to be becoming the industry standard. So I learned it by doing all my client work in it. As it happened I was getting several projects that involved longer documents like white papers and ebooks. That helped me at the day job when they gradually switched over to InDesign. I was quickly becoming the go-to expert my co-workers relied on when they couldn’t figure something out.

Thanks in part to the way learning something new opened up opportunities for me I was able to take on the challenge of growing my business, enough to do it full time now!
(To be continued.)

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Do you drive away customers inadvertently?

You may have a website that is fine and informative and otherwise gets the job done but there may be areas in it that could improve. Is it responsive—meaning adaptable to smaller screens like smartphones and tablets? If not that can turn away customers since over half of internet traffic comes from mobile devices these days.

Modern tragedy, pastel of cracked iPhone

Don’t have a site that breaks on mobile devices!

 

Or it may be something small and not that noticeable that bothers the people you are trying to target. Do you drive away customers inadvertently?

I know that when I encounter a site that takes too long to load I’m out of there. Or if music or a video starts to play the moment I land on the site and I didn’t expect it I’m gone. Then there’s the website that has the navigation in a different place on every page. That could definitely frustrate a would-be client/customer. These are some of the examples of ways your website could be driving away the people you want to attract.

If a feature is off-putting to your audience it’s not worth keeping. We can look at your site and recommend the tweaks needed to remove anything getting between you and your customers. It may be an easy fix and just the thing to get your business website helping instead of hurting you!